Saturday, February 25, 2017

Oscar Oddities




With the Oscars this weekend, it’s fun to look back at some of the odd and interesting facts you may not have known about the big event:
  • Tom Hank’s acceptance speech for his role in Philadelphia became the basis of the film In & Out.
  • Oscar winners sign a contract stipulating they cannot sell their Oscar without first offering it back to the Academy for the sum of $1.
  • One of the requirements to be nominated for an Oscar is that the movie has to be screened in an LA theater for at least 7 days.
  • 3 people have turned down their Oscars, including George C. Scott, who called the awards show a “meat parade” in 1971 and Marlon Brando in 1972.
  • Woody Allen refuses to attend or present at the Oscars, despite winning three awards.  His one appearance was in 2002 when he presented a short about New York City following the September 11, 2001 attacks.
  • Maggie Smith won an Oscar for portraying an actress who lost an Oscar in California Suite, making it the only film revolving around the Oscars to win one.
  • The only film to show an Oscar in a scene while also winning Best Picture is The Godfather.
  • Alfred Hitchcock and William Holden share the record for shortest acceptance speech.  They simply said “Thank you.”
  • Sealed envelopes became customary in 1941, a year after the LA Times broke the press embargo and printed the names of all of the winners before the ceremony.
  • John C. Reilly is the only modern actor to star in three films in the same year that were later nominated for Best Picture: Chicago, The Hours, and Gangs of New York in 2002.

These Oscar oddities are from the web site:

 Scott Handville, Assistant Library Director

Saturday, February 18, 2017

10 Books That Stayed With Me (That Maybe You Haven’t Read)



Recently I noticed a social media post making the rounds in which you are supposed to list ten books that have stayed with you in some way.  The goal is not to overthink it, but simply take a few minutes and answer.  They don't have to be great books or the “right” books, just books that have stayed with you, impacting you in some way.  So, in no particular order, here are ten books that have stayed with me:

1.     Nine Stories~ JD Salinger:  A collection of stories that is sometimes disturbing, but always full of melancholy.  My favorites are “For Esme--With Love and Squalor”, “Pretty Mouth and Green My Eyes”, and “De Daumier-Smith's Blue Period”.
2.    Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret~ Judy Blume:  This emotionally intense and angst-filled novel has a storyline that is issue-oriented and character-driven.  It grabbed my attention in the 4th grade, and has stuck with me ever since!
3.    Big Russ & Me~ Tim Russert:  This biography is truly heartwarming and quite candid.  The beloved television journalist writes about the relationship between him and his father and offers valuable lessons in life.
4.    The Catcher in the Rye~ J.D. Salinger:  If I was stranded on an island and could only take one book, this is the one I would take! Salinger's classic coming-of-age story is darkly humorous, reflective, and moving.
5.    The Body in the Library~ Agatha Christie:  This is the first Agatha Christie book I ever read, and it had me at the title!  Christie’s writing style is engaging and the storyline is intricately plotted in this Miss Marple case.
6.    Ethan Frome~ Edith Wharton: Admittedly, the tone is quite bleak and melancholic, but Wharton’s writing style is so descriptive and lyrical that I was sucked in on the first page and never put it down until I finished.  I shan’t spoil the story for you!
7.    On Writing: a Memoir of the Craft~ Stephen King:  A practical view of the writer's craft, King's advice is grounded in memories from childhood through his emergence as a writer.  The style is conversational, and the tone is reflective and darkly humorous.
8.    The Murder of Roger Ackroyd~ Agatha Christie:  Not your conventional Agatha Christie story!  It is one of her best known and most controversial novels, with an innovative twist ending, and is considered her masterpiece.
9.    The Notebook~ Nicholas Sparks:  This was Nicholas Sparks' first published novel, and I think it’s his best work.  The poignant love story was inspired by his wife’s grandparents and is told through scenes from the past and a collection of intensely personal letters.
10.  Wrecked~ Maria Padian:  I just read this YA novel recently.  It’s a multi-faceted interpretation of a sexual assault on a college campus that will leave you thinking how memory and identity, what's at stake, and who sits in judgment, all shape what we believe.
It’s always nice to see people celebrating books, but my favorite part of book lists is learning about books that I haven’t heard of before or that I haven’t read yet. So with that in mind, what books have stayed with you?
Sarah Duffy, Library Assistant

Saturday, February 11, 2017

The Children's Room






We are starting to carry Board Books that are in black and white for newborns to 6 months old. Ask the Librarian if you are looking for these books. More will be ordered in the coming months.

I will be going to the area schools for the READ to ME challenge which starts Feb. 2nd to Mar. 2nd. Classes are signing up for the visits, and the challenge is simple. Read with a child or group of children for at least 15 minutes, capture a photo or video, post it on social media with the hash tags #ReadtoME or #ReadaloudME, and nominate others to do the same. Creative ways of completing the challenge are encouraged – for example, read to a child or children using FaceTime or Skype. I challenge all that read this blog to find a child to read to during this time period and post it on social media.

We have an event coming up Tuesday during February vacation.