Saturday, January 14, 2017

Popular YA Reads



If you have a middle schooler at home, chances are it’s difficult to get them to read. Finding a book that is written at their level and also of interest to them is not an easy task. Following are a few selections recommended by some area middle schoolers:

The Boys Who Challenged Hitler by Phillip Hoose tells the true story of a group of boys who were resistance fighters after the Nazi invasion in Denmark.







The Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor is about a 17 year old art student at a boarding school in Prague. Her sketchbook is full of hideous monsters. This is Book 1 of a Trilogy.





 

The Girl I Used To Be by Christy Ottaviano tells us about Olivia, whose parents were killed fourteen years ago. Olivia finds herself involved when her parents’ case is reopened.






This Is Where It Ends by Marieke Nijkamp tells of a tragedy at a school in Alabama. The tale is told from the separate perspectives of four teenagers who are personally involved.


 Sarah Duffy, Library Assistant


Saturday, January 7, 2017

School Bus Book Bags



Have you ever been caught…...READING ON A SCHOOL BUS?!!!! Students within the MSAD #11 School District have been caught reading as they enjoy the opportunity to read books on the bus to and from school!  The School Bus Book Bag project is the brilliant and creative idea of Mr. Don Sanders, a school bus driver for MSAD #75 in Topsham, Maine.  He shared books with the very youngest students on his bus from his own home library in an effort to help them learn to sit in their seats quietly as they traveled to and from school each day. He noticed there was less disruptive behaviors on the bus and an eagerness by the older students to read to the younger students. The project also helped share further literacy throughout the community!  


The idea has come home to the MSAD #11 school district through a collaborative effort of the Gardiner Public Library, the MSAD #11 Transportation Department, and the non-profit, Maine Educational Connections for Children and Adults. The project has already grown from six buses carrying the book bags to almost a dozen buses sharing books from the local library! The book bags are alternated between the buses on a regular basis to keep the topics interesting and engaging for the students. Reading on the bus has fostered more love for reading, built a stronger foundation for literacy, promoted more positive family enrichment, connected children and families to the opportunity for their own library cards. It also has promoted further bus safety and a mentoring between older and younger students on the bus. One bus driver, Frederica, has exclaimed, “My kids love the books and are doing well!” Overall, the further growth of our healthy communities and the success of our children’s education has come from further reading opportunities! What do you think? Want to get caught reading? We have!!!
Ginni Nichols, Children’s Librarian

Saturday, December 31, 2016

New Year's Resolutions - Archivally Inspired!

Whether or not you're committing to New Year's Resolutions (or Intentions) this year, here are some great photos from our Community Archives Room that might help inspire us all to stick to our ideals in 2017....

Lose Weight
Gardiner's 1911 Police Force collectively weighed 2,800 pounds, winning a nationwide contest!
Save Money
Now Camden Savings Bank, Gardiner Savings Institution built their ultra-modern facility in the 1950s.




Eat Healthier
MacDonald's Bakery opened in 1921 and operated for over 70 years where the Craft Beer Cellar is now.


Spend More Time Outdoors
Shown here in the 1920s, Spring Cove on the Brunswick Road was a summer hot spot for decades.
Read More
1947 Summer Reading participants at the Gardiner Public Library in what was then the Children's Room and is now the Hazzard Reading Room.

Cut Down on Sweets
In 1923, Condos Candy Shop sold sweets where the Village Jeweler is now.

Carpool If You Can
This photo was taken in September 1940, just before the Sawyer Grain building (now Gardiner Feed) was built.

Get More Sleep
A young Gardiner man resting in his Bates College dormitory, c.1914.


Take a Class
The Kennebec School of Commerce operated in the upper floors of the bank building on the corner of Water and Church Streets from the mid-1930s through the 1940s and drew students from across the state.

Adopt a Pet
This 1920s cutie has ties to a Gardiner family and features prominently (along with many other dear pets) in their treasured scrapbook, which now lives in the Community Archives Room.
Make the Most of Less Than Perfect Situations
During the Flood of 1936 (just like those of 1896 and 1987), Gardiner folks temporarily adopted a Venetian lifestyle.
Shop Locally
Some of us still remember milk delivery from local farmers.  Today, this early 1900s Gardiner farmer could bring his wares to the Farmer's Market or the Co-Op!
Start a Big Project You've Been Meaning to Do
Gardiner dug up and re-paved Water Street in the early 1980s.



 Keep a Journal / Learn a New Language
This 1896 journal was kept by a Gardiner man on River Avenue and donated by a later homeowner who discovered it -- for the life of us, we have been unable to translate his unique shorthand.  Any ideas?

Stop and Smell the Roses (or Any Flowers)
This 1920s snapshot comes from a Gardiner family's large collection of negatives, many of which we are seeing for the first time in all their glory  -- thanks to our negative & slide scanner!
Exercise More
We have many old sports photos of Gardiner teams.  This one is simple titled "An Early Gardiner Baseball Nine" and is probably from the late 1800s.

Remember Important Dates
If you can't get enough of historic Gardiner, you can enjoy even more beautiful photos AND stay on top of 2017 with a copy of our new calendar -- still on sale at the library, Boys & Girls Club, and all around town for only $10.  All proceeds benefit the library and the Boys & Girls Club.


Happy New Year to All!!

- Dawn Thistle, Special Collections Librarian